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BREAST CANCER

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  • Head & Neck Cancer

    59 years old male patient from Rajasthan, IMPACT sponsored his TEP valve and later also gave him an electrolarynx free of cost. Operated in Jan. 2005.

    - Rajasthan

  • Head & Neck Cancer

    A 51 years old gentleman, working at a railway crossing near Viramgam, Gujarat, IMPACT sponsored his TEP Prosthesis in December 2003.

    - Viramgaam

Breast Cancer

A woman's breasts are made up of fat, connective tissue and thousands of tiny glands, known as lobules, which produce milk. If a woman has a baby, the milk is delivered to the nipple through tiny tubes called ducts, which allow her to breastfeed.

Symptoms of Breast Cancer

The first symptom of breast cancer most women notice is a lump or an area of thickened tissue in their breast. Most lumps (90%) are not cancerous, but it is always best to have them checked by your doctor.

See your GP if you notice any of the following:
  • A lump or area of thickened tissue in either breast.
  • A change in the size or shape of one or both breasts.
  • Discharge from either of your nipples (which may be streaked with blood).
  • A lump or swelling in either of your armpits.
  • Dimpling on the skin of your breasts.
  • A rash on or around your nipple.
  • A change in the appearance of your nipple, such as becoming sunken into your breast.
  • Pain in either of your breasts or armpits not related to your period.
Want to know more?
  • Breast Cancer Care: Changes to look and feel for.
  • Cancer Research UK: Breast cancer symptoms.
  • Macmillan: What are the symptoms of breast cancer?
Breast Awareness

So you can pick up any changes as soon as possible, it is important to be breast aware. Get to know what is normal for you. For instance, your breasts may look or feel different at different times of your life. This will make it much easier to spot potential problems.

When to Visit a Doctor

So you can pick up any changes as soon as possible, it is important to be breast aware. Get to know what is normal for you. For instance, your breasts may look or feel different at different times of your life. This will make it much easier to spot potential problems.

If you notice any of these symptoms, see your GP as soon as possible. After an examination, they may feel it necessary to refer you to a specialist breast cancer clinic for further tests.
Read more information about how breast cancer is diagnosed.

Types of Breast Cancer

There are several different types of breast cancer, which can develop in different parts of the breast. Breast cancer is often divided into non-invasive and invasive types.

Non-Invasive Breast Cancer

Non-invasive breast cancer is also known as cancer or carcinoma in situ. This cancer is found in the ducts of the breast and has not developed the ability to spread outside the breast. This form of cancer rarely shows as a lump in the breast and is usually found on a mammogram. The most common type of non-invasive cancer is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

Invasive Breast Cancer

Invasive cancer has the ability to spread outside the breast, although this does not mean it necessarily has spread. The most common form of breast cancer is invasive ductal breast cancer, which develops in the cells that line the breast ducts. Invasive ductal breast cancer accounts for about 80% of all cases of breast cancer and is sometimes called 'no special type'.

Other Types of Breast Cancer

Other less common types of breast cancer include invasive lobular breast cancer, which develops in the cells that line the milk-producing lobules, inflammatory breast cancer andPaget's disease of the breast. It is possible for breast cancer to spread to other parts of the body, usually through the lymph nodes (small glands that filter bacteria from the body) or the bloodstream. If this happens, it is known as secondary or metastatic breast cancer.

Breast Screening

The exact causes of breast cancer are not fully understood, but many factors increase the likelihood of developing it, including age and family history of breast cancer. Women who have a higher-than-average risk of developing breast cancer may be offered screening and genetic testing for the condition. As the risk of breast cancer increases with age, all women aged 50–70 are invited for breast cancer screening every three years. Women over 70 are also entitled to screening and can arrange an appointment through their GP or local screening unit.
Read more information about breast cancer screening.

Treating Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is treated using a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Some cases of breast cancer may also be treated using biological or hormone treatments. Being diagnosed with breast cancer can affect daily life in many ways. However, there is support available for many aspects of living with breast cancer including emotional, financial and long-term health issues. One in nine women are affected by breast cancer during their lifetime. There is a good chance of recovery if it is detected in its early stages. For this reason, it is vital that women check their breasts regularly for any changes and always get any changes examined by their GP. Learn more about how breast cancer is treated. Find your local cancer support services (including breast screening).